Shipbuilding Trends on the Global Stage

Shipbuilding Trends on the Global Stage   Shipbuilding is a highly competitive market and also one of the oldest in the world. Companies in the shipbuilding industry have to overcome peaks and slumps of the economy and the recent crisis of 2008 have hit the shibuilding industry quite badly. If you are someone working in the shipbuilding industry, it is important that you are aware of the shipbuilding trends on the global stage. The global order book over the past one and the half years since the financial crisis in the end of 2008 was 4.5 times lower than that for the 6 previous quarters. In 2009, the portfolio of new orders of European shipyards was almost 4 times lower than that in the year 2008. This is such a huge decline that we can say that the world’s shipbuilding industry is one of the worst affected sectors since the financial and economic crisis. With the bigger than ever fleet available and very little demand for their services this industry is going through quite a harrowing period. Until the middle of the last century, the Europeans have been dominating the world in the shipbuilding arena. The speedy growth of Japan’s economy also saw Japan doing many partnerships with the Europeans and together they dominated the shipbuilding industry. In fact the two countries controlled 90% of the market for quite some time until the land of the rising sun overtook the Europeans. However, come the 1970s, South Korea begin to lock its eyes on the shipbuilding industry and made the proclamation to the world that it is going to venture into the ship building industry...

Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore

The Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) is a statutory board under the Ministry of Transport of Singapore. The Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) was established on 2 February 1996 by the MPA Act of 1996 through the merger of the Marine Department, National Maritime Board and the Regulatory departments of the former Port of Singapore Authority. As Port Authority, MPA regulates and manages port and marine services, facilities and activities within the Singapore waters. This includes vessel traffic and navigational safety and security, through regulation on operational efficiency and on the environment. As Developer and Promoter, MPA works with other government agencies and maritime industry partners to make Singapore a leading global hub port and a top international maritime centre. Its aims include attracting a core group of shipowners and operators to set up operations in Singapore, broadening the breadth and depth of maritime ancillary services offered here, and improving on the business environment for the maritime industry. As the National Sea Transport Representative, the MPA safeguards Singapore’s maritime/port interests in the international arena. This extends to being the Government’s Advisor on matters relating to sea transport, and maritime/port services and facilities. IMPORTANT SITES MPA’s official website Singapore Maritime Portal, Singapore’s e-commerce Maritime portal. Singapore Registry of Ships, Singapore’s ship registry Singapore’s Port Statistics, Statistics on port performance Marinet, Online e-commerce system for the maritime community. Singapore Maritime Portal, Maritime e-commerce website. Singapore Maritime Foundation, Singapore’s maritime organisation. Singapore Shipping Association, Singapore’s maritime industry association. Regional Cooperation Agreement on Combating Piracy and Armed Robbery against Ships in Asia (ReCAAP), Information sharing centre on armed robbery...

Tugs and Barges

A tugboat (tug) is a boat that maneuvers vessels by pushing or towing them. Tugs move vessels that should not move themselves alone, such as ships in a crowded harbor or a narrow canal, or those that cannot move themselves, such as barges, disabled ships, or oil platforms. Tugboats are powerful for their size and strongly built, some are ocean-going. Some tugboats serve as icebreakers or salvage boats. Early tugboats had steam engines; today diesel engines are used. TYPES OF TUGBOATS Seagoing tugboats are in three basic categories: The standard seagoing tugboat with model bow that tows its “payload” on a hawser (long steel or soft fiber rope). The “notch tug” which can be secured in a notch at the stern of a specially designed barge, effectively making the combination a ship. This configuration, however, is dangerous to use with a barge which is “in ballast” (no cargo) or in a head or following sea. Therefore, the “notch tugs” are usually built with a towing winch. With this configuration, the barge being pushed might approach the size of a small ship, the interaction of the water flow allows a higher speed with a minimal increase in power required or fuel consumption. The “integral unit,” “integrated tug and barge,” or “ITB,” comprises specially designed vessels that lock together in such a rigid and strong method as to be certified as such by authorities (classification societies) such as the American Bureau of Shipping. Lloyd’s Register of Shipping, Indian Register of Shipping, Det Norske Veritas or several others. These units stay combined under virtually any sea conditions and the “tugs” usually have...